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graphite / graphene

Posted 03-28-2012 at 06:36 PM by jaro [Show Appreciation] What's This?
Updated 04-14-2012 at 08:41 PM by jaro (northern graphite + vanadium + lara explorations)

the hottest market sector right now? yep, u got it: graphite / graphene ... it melts at 3,700 degrees celsius :-)

well, maybe there are also other hot sectors out there i do not look at (military, nuclear industry, government bonds, ...), but among my commodity based stuff is graphite the only one which performs well recently. so what are the carbon heroes of my portfolio?
  • graphit kropfmühl
  • SGL carbon
  • focus metals
  • lara explorations
  • strike gold / strike graphite
  • zimtu capital
  • northern graphite
  • standard graphite corp
well, standard graphite corp (TSX-V:SGH) was the company which was presented by its CEO, the highly gifted public speaker chris bogart in munich 2day. ive bought few shares (very few) 2 days ago @ CAD 0.61 in order to generate some relationship to its story ... the price 2day? CAD 0.73 with a plus of 13.64% in the early market hours. what the hell is going on? it isnt abt the road-show only? and why did i buy only so few shares? u know why, dont u? of course, i dont really like 2 buy stocks which has tripled in the last few weeks/months, so i just made a small pilot buy and gonna watch this small canadian company from now on.

btw, the main reason ive attended the 2days presentation was dietmar siebholz. folks, thats the guy who called the precious metals rally, the rare earths mania and the graphite madness way before theyve started. so you better listen when dietmar speaks, u see? and yes, his suggestion focus metals from last munichs precious metals show is one of very very few of my stocks which are up since then. imho dietmar is an engineer whos investment approach is often driven by the newest technological developments, so u can be sure the demand for graphite will go up like crazy soon. of course, he told many things where is this stuff going to be used like batteries, green energy, etc and so on. just ask wikipedia, my dear. but if u asked me, we shouldnt ignore the classical lead pencil use case as well. not every blogger blogs via internet like me, there are still many millions paper diary writers out there, arent they? lol

anyway, as long as china cornered the supply side of graphites supply-demand-equation, im not going 2 worry abt any usage of that black lightweight conductive fire resistant metal which looks like plastic 2 me.

what the hell is graphene? some very pure graphite i guess. pls dont ask me any details, u know ive no clue abt technology and i dont care ;-)


source: http://www.standardgraphite.com

any additional insights? coming soon or never

ps: if you are interested in some future hot market, you should prolly consider VANADIUM. of course, its also used in batteries, but dietmar siebholz thought that the techn. research isnt that far yet to already proven that this technology would really work fine

~~~
folks, thx 2 TecTonics post below i can enhance few graphite basics:

Supply and Demand

The natural graphite market is 1-1.2 million tons per year and consists of several different forms of graphite – flake, amorphous and lump. Historical applications primarily use amorphous and lump graphite, most newly emerging technologies and applications use flake graphite. Of the up to 1.2 million tons of graphite that are processed each year just 40% is flake.

China, India and Canada are responsible for most graphite mining and processing with China producing the lion’s share at 70–80%. China’s production is 70% amorphous and lower value small flake graphite.

Currently China imports a significant amount of North Korea’s large flake graphite production raising considerable doubts in regards to China’s abilities to ramp up its graphite supply. Indeed China has already taken steps to retain its graphite resources by restricting its export quota - China imposed a 20% export duty, a 17% VAT and also closed state owned enterprises.

“The days of cheap, abundant graphite from China are over.” Industrial Minerals Magazine May, 2011.

It’s thought that the increased use of lithium-ion batteries could gobble up well over 1.6 Mt of flake graphite per year by 2020 - only flake, upgraded to 99.9% purity and synthetic graphite (made from petroleum coke, a very expensive process) can be used in lithium-ion batteries.

“Annual flake graphite production will have to increase by a factor of six by 2020 to meet incremental lithium carbonate requirements for batteries.” Canaccord research report.
~~~~

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  1. Old Comment
    Simit Patel's Avatar
    jaro, may i suggest northern graphite......up over 100% this year. sprott is an investor.

    i like focus and strike as well, they are both on my watchlist. going to check out the others you listed here as well

    these stocks have been on a tear, rallying even when the market as a whole does not.....ive been waiting for the pullback, but it hasnt come yet.....i might miss out on this altogether as a result, we'll see. but hraphite seems to be what rare earths were in 2010-2011.
    permalink
    Posted 03-28-2012 at 08:06 PM by Simit Patel Simit Patel is online now [Show Appreciation] What's This?
  2. Old Comment
    forexer's Avatar
    Guys, what's the basis for these producers to rally? Graphite is basically carbon...
    permalink
    Posted 03-29-2012 at 12:56 AM by forexer forexer is offline [Show Appreciation] What's This?
  3. Old Comment
    Simit Patel's Avatar
    as peak oil issue grows and oil prices go higher, the demand for other forms of energy -- solar, wind, nuclear -- is growing. a bunch of stuff is used in creating the systems that can make these energy sources work; for instance, solar, wind, and nuclear all use rare earths, and they all use graphite too.

    there is a supply/demand imbalance in graphite: Beat the Market Stock Picks: Graphite... Set to Go Critical in 2012
    permalink
    Posted 03-29-2012 at 06:58 AM by Simit Patel Simit Patel is online now [Show Appreciation] What's This?
  4. Old Comment
    jaro's Avatar
    yep ... and on top china cornered the supply side like it did in the rare earths sector before ...
    permalink
    Posted 03-29-2012 at 01:56 PM by jaro jaro is offline [Show Appreciation] What's This?
  5. Old Comment
    jaro's Avatar
    ok, just added 100 shares of northern graphite at a skyrocketed price of CAD 3.23 ... lets see if theyll come down for some increase of my position ...

    btw, if u asked me, this graphite madness is more an advertisement/promotion driven sector than a real supply demand issue ... it is simply too hot

    you still remember all these 'issues': gold, silver, solar/wind energy, uranium, oil, wheat, base metals, potash, lithium, rare earths, ... of course, there is some need for the stuff, but the promotion machinery runs the prices up like crazy and some time later they fell by 50%-80% ... hmmmm, this could be an exit strategy game, isnt it?
    permalink
    Posted 03-29-2012 at 02:17 PM by jaro jaro is offline [Show Appreciation] What's This?
  6. Old Comment
    jaro's Avatar
    standard graphite +9.59% today,
    strike graphite +9.38%

    ... the madness continues further, isnt it? it is just crazy, sooo many brand-new 'graphite' companies, no earnings at all, soooo rudimentary websites, sooo grandiose stock performance ... and sooo many stupid investors (like me) who buy even at these stellar levels ... strange homo sapiens financialis
    permalink
    Posted 03-30-2012 at 03:32 PM by jaro jaro is offline [Show Appreciation] What's This?
  7. Old Comment
    Simit Patel's Avatar
    still very early in the graphite bubble, nobody outside of the resource sector talks about it.....rare earth producer molycorp went up over 8X in less than 12 months -- graphite stocks haven't even doubled yet......i think i will take a small stake in some, but of course the focus is on gold stocks -- that will be the best bubble of all, in my opinion......

    EDIT: actually some graphite producers like northern graphite have doubled. but none have tripled!
    permalink
    Posted 03-30-2012 at 03:37 PM by Simit Patel Simit Patel is online now [Show Appreciation] What's This?
  8. Old Comment
    Group 1
    NGC, FDR, FMS ( MegaGraphite and HN.P when IPO comes)

    Group 2 (wanna be/could be)lol
    SRK, GPH, EGZ, SGH, LMR, ZEN, FGR, SOV, GR

    Group 3 (won't be and not real sure cause they need DD'ing and i am lazy)lol

    ATT, CJC, GXY, CVN, GMA, AEL, PNS, RA, NRT, SX, UBR, LRA
    permalink
    Posted 03-30-2012 at 05:04 PM by TechTonic TechTonic is offline [Show Appreciation] What's This?
  9. Old Comment
    This is a quote from other link, I do not know the proper way to quote other links on this site. If I step on any toes, please let me know how to do it, the "right" way.

    Also, the price per ton on graphite is too simplistic for some. One should read about how the miner process graphite. There are a lot more then meets the eye.

    Feb 14, 2012 | Posted by: MiningFeeds.com



    In 2010 a European Commission included graphite among the 14 materials it considered high in both economic importance and supply risk. The British Geological Survey listed graphite as one of the materials to most likely be in short supply globally. The US has also declared graphite a critical material. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and the State Department, said America could be hurt if terrorists were to disable graphite mines in China.

    Supply and Demand

    The natural graphite market is 1-1.2 million tons per year and consists of several different forms of graphite – flake, amorphous and lump. Historical applications primarily use amorphous and lump graphite, most newly emerging technologies and applications use flake graphite. Of the up to 1.2 million tons of graphite that are processed each year just 40% is flake.

    China, India and Canada are responsible for most graphite mining and processing with China producing the lion’s share at 70–80%. China’s production is 70% amorphous and lower value small flake graphite.

    Currently China imports a significant amount of North Korea’s large flake graphite production raising considerable doubts in regards to China’s abilities to ramp up its graphite supply. Indeed China has already taken steps to retain its graphite resources by restricting its export quota - China imposed a 20% export duty, a 17% VAT and also closed state owned enterprises.

    “The days of cheap, abundant graphite from China are over.” Industrial Minerals Magazine May, 2011.

    It’s thought that the increased use of lithium-ion batteries could gobble up well over 1.6 Mt of flake graphite per year by 2020 - only flake, upgraded to 99.9% purity and synthetic graphite (made from petroleum coke, a very expensive process) can be used in lithium-ion batteries.

    “Annual flake graphite production will have to increase by a factor of six by 2020 to meet incremental lithium carbonate requirements for batteries.” Canaccord research report.

    The U.S. Geological Survey says large-scale fuel cell applications are being developed that could consume as much graphite as all other uses combined – a bold statement, but even if only half of the USGS demand is realized graphite use is going to explode just because of fuel cells, let alone other known demand drivers and new applications.

    What if the current market almost doubles – new demand, between now and 2020, comes in at one million tonnes on top of the existing 1.2 million?

    Today’s graphite producers, other than the ones in China, are going to have to produce more and junior companies are going to have to get busy and start to develop deposits. There will be a premium placed on mines in stable, safe areas for investment.

    Since a large scale producer puts out 20,000 to 40,000 tons per year that’s a lot of new mines and a lot of opportunity for investors – one million tonnes divided by 40,000 could be the equivalent of up to twenty five mines worth of new production needed – and that’s a severe low-balling of the experts forecast increased usage numbers.

    From the article entitled, "Graphite: Pencil It In" by Rick Mills author and host of Aheadoftheherd.com. The information provided herein has been provided to MiningFeeds.com by the author and, as such, is subject to our disclaimer
    permalink
    Posted 03-30-2012 at 05:14 PM by TechTonic TechTonic is offline [Show Appreciation] What's This?
  10. Old Comment
    jaro's Avatar
    thx TechTonic for your enhancemet/update

    dietmar siebholz also told that only the flake, upgraded to 99.9% purity graphite can be used in lithium-ion batteries, but i was too tired/lazy 2 write more details yesterday.

    if you dont mind, i would simply copy part of your post and improve my original blog post
    jaro
    permalink
    Posted 03-30-2012 at 06:24 PM by jaro jaro is offline [Show Appreciation] What's This?
  11. Old Comment
    jaro's Avatar
    folks, next 'prove' that the graphite market is too hot? there is not enough independent information out there! the most media just copies the 1 or 2 existing analyses all over the web / print media, even the pictures are often the same (e.g. projected demand) ...

    OMG

    btw, if you are interested in some future hot market, you should prolly consider VANADIUM. of course, its also used in batteries, but dietmar siebholz thought that the techn. research isnt that far yet to already proven that this technology would really work fine
    permalink
    Posted 03-30-2012 at 06:43 PM by jaro jaro is offline [Show Appreciation] What's This?
  12. Old Comment
    Jaro,

    Please use anything on the list.

    You are right. Graphite extraction [flake] is more then meets the eye.

    I did the experiment for a pilot project on flake graphite before.

    There is another quote I will put up here.
    permalink
    Posted 03-31-2012 at 11:36 AM by TechTonic TechTonic is offline [Show Appreciation] What's This?
  13. Old Comment
    http://www.graphiteblog.com/2012/03/...e-high-yesterd
    ay-probably-because-this-is-the-hottest-sector-to-watch-so-allow-me-to-make-a-f.
    html#more




    GraphiteBlog broke our all-time high yesterday. Probably because this is the hottest sector to watch, so allow me to make a few points about its use and long-term demand. It seems the graphite sector is going the way of the rare earths and as graphite’s application’s become more prevalent it begs questioning about its potential role in national defense and security systems. With the US fully dependent on imports for meeting its own graphite demands and without viable alternatives -- can’t help but wonder about what will happen next in the graphite sector.

    China has imposed a 20% export duty, a 17% value added tax (VAT) and an export licensing system in trying to control the graphite market, as it has done with rare earths. Additional tightening of the reins on graphite supply is also expected and this will push prices for graphite and particularly the flake kind even higher.

    The European Commission, the British Geological Survey and the US State Department have all declared graphite as critical raw material based on its importance in traditional industries such as steel making alongside its importance to new and emerging technologies. A third factor is that China controls a large amount of the graphite industry and currently produces in excess of 70% of the world’s graphite supply -- this includes the majority of the supply for the amorphous and flake graphite markets. Graphite is also produced in India, Brazil, North Korea, Madagascar, Sri Lanka, and Canada.

    A press release dated June 17, 2010, on the Europa.eu website, the official website of the EU, titled Report Forecasts Shortages of 14 Critical Mineral Raw Materials states that “For the critical raw materials, their high supply risk is mainly due to the fact that a high share of the worldwide production mainly comes from a handful of countries: China (antimony, fluorspar, gallium, germanium, graphite, indium, magnesium, rare earths, tungsten), Russia (platinum group metals), the Democratic Republic of Congo (cobalt, tantalum) and Brazil (niobium and tantalum). This production concentration, in many cases, is compounded by low substitutability and low recycling rates.”

    The graphite market primarily includes three types of graphite: amorphous graphite, flake graphite and lump graphite. Each type occurs in different types of ore deposits. The many traditional and emerging uses of graphite have been detailed in various posts on GrahiteBlog already. However here’s a very brief rundown.

    Historical applications include the use of graphite in pencils, steel making, brake linings, foundry facings and lubricants. These applications require mostly amorphous and lump graphite and the automotive and steel industries account for the majority of consumption. Graphite is used to augment to carbon content of steel and in turn it increases the strength of the steel and makes it capable of withstanding higher temperatures. It is estimated that the steel industry and the automotive industry grow by 5% per year.

    The energy sector also requires graphite for pebble-bed nuclear reactors, lithium-ion batteries, fuel cells and photovoltaic panels. These applications are propelling the increased demand for high-grade, large-flake graphite and as green energy technologies become more economical and more prevalent the demand for graphite will also rise. Graphite is also key component of vanadium redox battery technology that requires 300 tonnes of flake graphite for 1,000 megawatts of storage. Production of the vanadium redox battery is expected to rise with the increase alternative energy such as wind and solar power. The combination of vanadium and graphite enable long-term storage or an unlimited capacity of excess energy and this technology is a solution to interrupted power production often associated with wind and solar energy.

    Lithium ion batteries are widely used in consumer electronics like cell phones, laptops and power tools. These batteries are replacing nickel-metal-hydride batteries used in electric vehicles, electric motorcycles and scooters. Interestingly, the lithium-ion battery’s name does not reflect that fact they contain 20-times more graphite than lithium. Future demand for consumer electronics is also forecasted to increase and this will also increase the demand for graphite. It is estimated that the demand for graphite for use in lithium-ion batteries will grow 25% per year meaning that the production of lithium-ion batteries would require more than 1.6 million tonnes of high-grade flake graphite during the next decade. Considering that electric vehicle (EV) production is forecasted to grow to as much as 6 million units and that each EV requires 40 pounds of graphite, 240 million pounds of graphite will be needed to meet that demand.

    The quality of flake graphite depends on grade and particle size. These factors also determine its price with most consumers of flake graphite preferring to use high-grade and large-flake in their products. For example amorphous graphite for steel making trades for about $850 per tonnes whereas flake graphite depending on the flake size is being sold for $2,000 to $3,000 per tonne.

    The supply of graphite is not experiencing the same growth as its demand. A recent report by Canaccord states “Annual flake graphite production will have to increase by a factor of six by 2020 to meet incremental lithium carbonate requirements for batteries.”
    .
    EDIT: the $2000-$3000/ton of flake graphite is cheap. One has to realize the extraction method used in extracting the material and the specific gravity of graphite is low.
    permalink
    Posted 03-31-2012 at 11:49 AM by TechTonic TechTonic is offline [Show Appreciation] What's This?
  14. Old Comment
    jaro's Avatar
    thx tectonic 4 the great update on the supply/demand issues of the graphite market and yes, vanadium could be the next investment story

    well, if i could find some new money 2 invest i will look 4 vanadium explorers/producers
    permalink
    Posted 04-01-2012 at 06:02 PM by jaro jaro is offline [Show Appreciation] What's This?
  15. Old Comment
    jaro's Avatar
    new day, new luck, is it?
    • standard graphite +10.00%
    • strike graphite +11.43%
    any additional comments?
    permalink
    Posted 04-02-2012 at 11:54 AM by jaro jaro is offline [Show Appreciation] What's This?
  16. Old Comment
    jaro's Avatar
    what abt the closing quotes 2day?
    • standard graphite +12.50%
    • strike graphite +17.14%
    no additional comments
    permalink
    Posted 04-02-2012 at 05:34 PM by jaro jaro is offline [Show Appreciation] What's This?
  17. Old Comment
    jaro's Avatar
    hi folks,

    s.o. dropped a link with 72 graphite companies on my blogger blog ... well, im not sure if it is promotion/advertisment or a reliable information ... well, maybe wants s.o. go through the graphite list anyway ...

    http://www.vanadiumsite.com/investin...aphite-stocks/

    permalink
    Posted 04-25-2012 at 05:24 PM by jaro jaro is offline [Show Appreciation] What's This?
  18. Old Comment
    THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO--(Marketwire - Oct. 3, 2012) - Zenyatta Ventures Ltd. ("Zenyatta" or "Company") (TSX VENTURE:ZEN) is pleased to announce that a first pass beneficiation test at SGS Canada Inc. ("Lakefield") demonstrated a leaching process capable of producing a 97.2% C (total) graphite product from a rough concentrate. Work is on-going to target purity levels of greater than 99.0% C with results from a second series of tests expected soon.

    Aubrey Eveleigh, President and CEO, stated "It is very significant and remarkable to start with such a high purity level of greater than 97% graphite on the first test. Management is excited with the latest successful metallurgical developments and considers higher purity graphite achievable with fine-tuning of the process."

    In conjunction with Don Hains of Zenyatta, Lakefield metallurgical test work of the Albany graphite material continues to develop a simple concentration and leaching process to produce an ultra-high purity (greater than 99.0% C) graphite product. Again, mineralogical work shows the graphite material to be very simple and contains insignificant amounts of undesirable material. This confirms an earlier mineralogical report prepared by Dr. Andrew Conly, Ph.D. of Lakehead University.

    Aubrey Eveleigh also stated "Presently, Zenyatta's Albany is the only new vein type graphite deposit being developed in the world. It is the only one of its kind outside of the mined vein type graphite deposits of Sri Lanka."

    Sri Lankan vein type graphite grades are available in purities ranging from 80-99% carbon with the majority above 90%. The Bogala Mine, a Sri Lankan graphite deposit, has been in production since 1847. It is a narrow (20cm), high grade underground mine. Sri Lankan graphite still enjoys great demand due to its unusually high purity and unique physical properties. Graphite veins are quite rare and in many industrial applications offer superior performance due to higher thermal and electrical conductivity.

    The Albany (vein-type) graphite deposit is located 30km north of the Trans Canada Highway, power line and natural gas pipeline. A rail line is located 70km away and an all-weather road approximately 4-5km from the graphite deposit. The Albany deposit is near surface, underneath glacial till overburden.

    The outlook for the global graphite market is very promising with demand growing rapidly from new applications in clean technology. China produces over 70% of global supply and, like other commodities, now has less available for export as domestic demand grows. As global demand outstrips supply, graphite prices have increased substantially, more than doubling over the past three years.

    Graphite is a natural form of carbon with the chemical formula C, which it shares with diamond and coal. It is now considered one of the more strategic elements by many leading industrial nations, particularly for its growing importance in high technology manufacturing and in the emerging "green" industries, such as electric vehicle components. The application for graphitic material is constantly evolving due to its unique chemical, electrical and thermal properties. It maintains its stability and strength under temperatures in excess of 3,500 degrees C and is very resistant to chemical corrosion. It is also one of the lightest of all reinforcing elements and has high natural lubricating abilities. Some of these key physical and chemical properties make it critical to modern industry.

    Mr. Aubrey Eveleigh, P.Geo., President and CEO, is the "Qualified Person" under NI 43-101 and has reviewed the technical information contained in this news release. Analyses were carried out by SGS Canada Inc. lab using a total carbon (LECO) method. To find out more on Zenyatta Ventures Ltd., please visit website Zenyatta - Zenyatta Ventures Welcomes you to our New Site.

    This News Release includes certain "forward-looking statements". These statements are based on information currently available to the Company and the Company provides no assurance that actual results will meet management's expectations. Forward-looking statements include estimates and statements that describe the Company's future plans, objectives or goals, including words to the effect that the Company or management expects a stated condition or result to occur. Forward-looking statements may be identified by such terms as "believes", "anticipates", "expects", "estimates", "may", "could", "would", "will", "should" or "plan". Since forward-looking statements are based on assumptions and address future events and conditions, by their very nature they involve inherent risks and uncertainties. Actual results relating to, among other things, results of exploration, project development, reclamation and capital costs of the Company's mineral properties, and the Company's financial condition and prospects, could differ materially from those currently anticipated in such statements for many reasons such as: changes in general economic conditions and conditions in the financial markets; changes in demand and prices for minerals; litigation, legislative, environmental and other judicial, regulatory, political and competitive developments; technological and operational difficulties encountered in connection with the activities of the Company; and other matters discussed in this news release. This list is not exhaustive of the factors that may affect any of the Company's forward-looking statements. These and other factors should be considered carefully and readers should not place undue reliance on the Company's forward-looking statements. The Company does not undertake to update any forward-looking statement that may be made from time to time by the Company or on its behalf, except in accordance with applicable securities laws.

    Neither TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.

    permalink
    Posted 10-03-2012 at 04:50 PM by TechTonic TechTonic is offline [Show Appreciation] What's This?
  19. Old Comment
    jaro's Avatar
    thx techtonic for your feedback ... btw, strange taht the share price didn't moved an inch on that news (currently +0%) ... well, it is a really tough time for junior mining companies since early 2011 as the only thing the market values is cash and cash flow ...

    damn, almost all my graphen positions are down 50-60% together with all the other junior exploration / mining stocks ... stupid me, again

    good luck, anyway
    j.
    permalink
    Posted 10-04-2012 at 11:43 AM by jaro jaro is offline [Show Appreciation] What's This?
  20. Old Comment
    THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO--(Marketwire - Feb. 5, 2013) - Zenyatta Ventures Ltd. ("Zenyatta" or "Company") (TSX VENTURE:ZEN) is pleased to announce the following significant results from a second series of beneficiation tests conducted at SGS Canada Inc. ("Lakefield") on samples from its 100% owned Albany graphite deposit. Trials using two different leaching processes both yielded results exceeding the target of greater than 99.0% Carbon ("C").

    One process yielded 99.7% C while another different and cheaper process yielded an exceptional purity of 99.96% C. This is further confirmation of earlier mineralogical studies that showed the Albany 'vein-type' graphite material to be of high quality and containing minor amounts of impurities. The ability to produce a natural graphite product equivalent in purity to the highest grade synthetic graphite using low-cost conventional processing techniques will allow Zenyatta to target the growing market in high value-added graphite applications.

    Aubrey Eveleigh, President and CEO stated, "Achieving these ultra-high purity carbon values at such an early stage from a simple and relatively inexpensive process is truly remarkable. This large 'vein-type' graphite deposit appears to be 'one of a kind' globally in both size and quality." Eveleigh also stated, "With accelerated global interest in the Albany graphite deposit, Zenyatta will continue to discuss the merits of the project with potential strategic partners, including graphite end-users."

    Natural graphite material has varying levels of quality depending on the type (vein, flake or amorphous). The degree of purity can vary greatly, which heavily influences the use of the material in applications and its pricing. Carbon purity of natural graphite can generally range from 70.0% all the way to 99.0%, whereas synthetic graphite is usually greater than 99.0%. Given the ultra-high purity at Zenyatta's Albany project, the Company will be positioning the material to compete in the $13 billion (1.5 million tonnes annually) synthetic market.

    Synthetic graphite is significantly more expensive to make but commands the highest market prices due to its purity. It can cost $4000 - $5000 per tonne (99.5% purity) to produce but can be sold for $7000 - $9000 per tonne. Ultra-high purity (99.9%) graphite can demand a price of $20,000 - $30,000 per tonne. Processing and purification of natural graphite has improved greatly in recent years and projects with initial high purity graphite, like the Albany vein-type, require less purification and therefore lower cost to produce.

    Synthetic graphite producers are faced with escalating energy costs associated with turning petroleum coke into graphite. Petroleum coke is the solid waste remaining after refining oil. To turn petroleum coke into graphite requires extensive thermal treatment (up to 3000 degrees C), in various steps, to burn off impurities and re-arrange graphite layers. Not only is this energy intensive but also an environmental issue. Another big concern for synthetic producers is the diminishing supply of petroleum (needle) coke derived from low sulfur, sweet crude oil. Therefore, natural high purity graphite is gaining traction over synthetic graphite for many applications due to lower cost of production. Also, natural graphite has superior qualities such as higher specific capacity and less porosity.

    Zenyatta is developing a very rare 'vein-type' graphite deposit it discovered in 2011 in northeastern Ontario, Canada. It is the largest and only known 'vein type' graphite deposit under development in the world. Previously announced drill intersections at the Albany project have been as high as 170 metres grading 6.6% C. Globally, the only graphite mines of this type are located in Sri Lanka, which have been in production since 1847. The current high grade, underground mining operations produce only 5,500 tonnes annually from narrow (5-10cm) veins. Despite the lack of volume, Sri Lankan 'vein-type' graphite has enjoyed great demand due to its unusually high purity and unique physical properties. Graphite veins are quite rare and in many industrial applications offer superior performance due to higher thermal and electrical conductivity.

    Zenyatta's Albany graphite deposit is located 30km north of the Trans Canada Highway, power line and natural gas pipeline near the communities of Constance Lake First Nation and Hearst. A rail line is located 70km away and an all-weather road approximately 4-5km from the graphite deposit. The deposit is near surface, underneath glacial till overburden and a thin veneer of Paleozoic sedimentary cover rocks.

    Graphite is a natural form of carbon with the chemical formula C, which it shares with diamond and coal. The outlook for the global graphite market is very promising with demand growing rapidly from new applications. It is now considered one of the more strategic elements by many leading industrial nations, particularly for its growing importance in high technology manufacturing and in the emerging "green" industries such as electric vehicle components. The application for graphitic material is constantly evolving due to its unique chemical, electrical and thermal properties. It maintains its stability and strength under temperatures in excess of 3,500 degrees C and is very resistant to chemical corrosion. It is also one of the lightest of all reinforcing elements and has high natural lubricating abilities. Some of these key physical and chemical properties make it critical to modern industry.

    The Company also wishes to announce that further to its press release of November 22, 2012, it has received approval from the TSX Venture Exchange to extend the terms of 11,740,000 common share purchase warrants (collectively, the "Warrants") issued prior to the Company's initial public offering in December 2010. Each Warrant entitles the holder to acquire one common share of Zenyatta for $1.00 per share and, pursuant to the Warrant term extension, the expiry date of the Warrants is June 23, 2013. The remaining warrants of 1,054,000 at $0.25 and 1,261,549 at $0.60, which were due on 23 December 2012, were all exercised.

    Zenyatta now has 42,385,862 common shares issued and outstanding with a total of 57,575,862 shares on a fully diluted basis. Mr. Aubrey Eveleigh, P.Geo., President and CEO, is the "Qualified Person" under NI 43-101 and has reviewed the technical information contained in this news release. To find out more on Zenyatta Ventures Ltd., please visit website Zenyatta - Zenyatta Ventures Welcomes you to our New Site or contact the Company at info@zenyatta.ca or Tel. 807-346-1660.

    This News Release includes certain "forward-looking statements". These statements are based on information currently available to the Company and the Company provides no assurance that actual results will meet management's expectations. Forward-looking statements include estimates and statements that describe the Company's future plans, objectives or goals, including words to the effect that the Company or management expects a stated condition or result to occur. Forward-looking statements may be identified by such terms as "believes", "anticipates", "expects", "estimates", "may", "could", "would", "will", "should" or "plan". Since forward-looking statements are based on assumptions and address future events and conditions, by their very nature they involve inherent risks and uncertainties. Actual results relating to, among other things, results of exploration, project development, reclamation and capital costs of the Company's mineral properties, and the Company's financial condition and prospects, could differ materially from those currently anticipated in such statements for many reasons such as: changes in general economic conditions and conditions in the financial markets; changes in demand and prices for minerals; litigation, legislative, environmental and other judicial, regulatory, political and competitive developments; technological and operational difficulties encountered in connection with the activities of the Company; and other matters discussed in this news release. This list is not exhaustive of the factors that may affect any of the Company's forward-looking statements. These and other factors should be considered carefully and readers should not place undue reliance on the Company's forward-looking statements. The Company does not undertake to update any forward-looking statement that may be made from time to time by the Company or on its behalf, except in accordance with applicable securities laws.

    Neither TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.

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    Posted 02-05-2013 at 09:14 PM by TechTonic TechTonic is offline [Show Appreciation] What's This?
 

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